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Enchantés

Chers chanteurs !


Here is the advertising flier for the launch of Enchantés - the french vocal workshop in L.A./Venice Beach area. I am really excited to open this group for the community.
The goal is to create an exciting francophile group who meets once a week to speak french and sing beautiful masterpieces from renaissance to contemporary repertoire, including French „chansons” and traditional folk music. Every Season, we will have a specific theme and one or two performances for the community.


Vous aimez chanter ? Love to sing ?
Francophone or Francophile?
Fluent in French or just’ un petit peu ?
Then this group is for you !


The $10/week suggested donation for this workshop is to help to cover the cost of the rent, music copies and the music director.


À bientôt !

Anaïs de la Morandais
 

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Music Makes You a Better Reader, says Neuroscience

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Music Makes You a Better Reader, says Neuroscience

Nina Kraus, director of the Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory at Northwestern University and research collaborator on the Harmony Project has spent her life surrounded by music. And, today, she is studying how musical training can harness the brain’s natural plasticity, or adaptiveness, to help students become better overall students and readers, even when they grow up in impoverished environments.
“Music and language skills rely upon auditory processing. Although reading may not be thought of as a primarily auditory activity, its foundation rests on a child making sense of incoming auditory input in order to map speech sounds correctly on to orthographic representations,” says Kraus. “Many of the same aspects of sound processing that are deficient in children with language and learning impairments have been found to be strengthened in those who receive music training, and music-based interventions have demonstrated some success in the remediation of reading problems, too.”

Excerpt from article by Kayt Skukel. Read more at http://magazine.good.is/articles/music-literacy-brain

 

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Music for youth development

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Music for youth development

Although playing music is not considered a basic need, it is a great wrap-around tool for youth development, serving to increase education, academic success, family well-being, social skills, and confidence. 

Enrolling your child in a choir has many benefits for his/her development:

Under 5 years old, singing songs bring kindergarten readiness to your child through rhythm structures, develop musical expressions using movement, kinesthetic awareness, and speech.

Music is a a positive way to bond with each other and bridge gaps. A musical community enables interaction with students of all backgrounds in order to achieve a common artistic goal. Besides being a wonderful art, music convey a message of peace and brotherhood.

In an orchestra or choir, every individual is responsible to know his part which encourages him/her to become autonomous and self-sufficient and simultaneously they have to cooperate with their peers and play together. Hence, teaching them the skill of multi-tasking.

Choir is a social and educational activity that develops very positive life benefits like civic involvement and philanthropy, memory skills and academic success, confidence and better emotional management, self-discipline and punctuality. It is also a way to learn about different cultures. When your child sing in another language it also stimulates his/her brain and eases the process of learning other languages later.


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Benefit of music for your brain

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Benefit of music for your brain

According to neuroscientist  PhD Anita Collins, Music education and the brain what does it take to make a change? (2014): “Playing a musical instrument engages practically every area of the brain at once, especially the visual, auditory, and motor cortices. <...> a large number of benefits from music education including improvements in memory, language acquisition, executive function, and brain plasticity.

A short video on TED summorize her research demonstrating how making music affect the brain and why it is so efficient for brain development. 

More about her work and publications on: http://www.anitacollinsmusic.com/neuroandmused/

 

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